Poverty and Intergenerational Change: Preliminary Findings from the Round 5 Survey in Peru

Young Lives is an international study of childhood poverty, following the lives of 12,000 children in 4 countries

Abstract

There is considerable improvement in household welfare of the Younger Cohort over time, with the wealth index increasing at an average annual growth rate (AAGR) of 3.1%, and real household expenditure per capita increasing at an AAGR of 4.6%. However, between Rounds 4 and 5 (2013 and 2016), the rate of change of these improvements lessened.

Looking at specific dimensions of wealth over 15 years, the largest improvements have been in access to services and ownership of consumer durables, whereas the smallest improvement has been in housing.

Differentials by socio-economic background continue to reduce over time, although differences persist. Some have greatly reduced (e.g. access to electricity), while others remain or have increased (e.g. quality of the materials of walls, roof and floor of dwellings).

At the age of 22, the Older Cohort is substantially better off in terms of educational attainment and adult height compared to their parents. Socio-economic differences are of a different nature, depending less on school completion and more on higher education.

Young Lives is an international study of childhood poverty, following the lives of 12,000 children in 4 countries (Ethiopia, India, Peru and Vietnam) over 15 years. Young Lives is funded by the UK Department for International Development

Citation

Sanchez, Alan and Nicolás Pazos (2018), Poverty and Intergenerational Change: Preliminary Findings from the Round 5 Survey in Peru. Young Lives Fact Sheet Round 5. Oxford: Young Lives

Poverty and Intergenerational Change: Preliminary Findings from the Round 5 Survey in Peru

Published 31 December 2017