Periodic Presumptive Treatment for Sexually Transmitted Infections (STI): Experience from the Field and Recommendations for Research.

Abstract

This document (available in English and French) summarizes the findings of an international technical consultation held in London, UK, in September 2005. The aim was to: review experience with periodic presumptive treatment (treatment for presumed infection in people at high risk of infection whether or not they show symptoms) for sexually transmitted diseases (STIs) in developing countries; identify the conditions under which such treatment might be an effective element of an STI control and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) prevention strategy; produce guidelines on the use of such treatment for STIs; and make recommendations for further research in this field. It is concluded that such treatment should be considered (as an interim measure) as a component of STI prevention and control programmes for appropriate populations, such as sex workers with poor access to health-care services and at high risk of STIs; that this approach should be combined with concurrent plans to establish good services; and that once adequate services are established and/or infections are controlled to lower prevalence levels, periodic presumptive treatment interventions should be discontinued.

Citation

WHO; London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine; Population Council. Periodic Presumptive Treatment for Sexually Transmitted Infections (STI): Experience from the Field and Recommendations for Research. (2008) 21 pp. ISBN 978-92-4-159705-0

Help us improve GOV.UK

Don’t include personal or financial information like your National Insurance number or credit card details.