Non-state provision of skills development in South Asia (GSDRC Helpdesk Research Report 1196)

Non-state providers include for-profit training institutes, businesses, non-governmental organisations and employers’ and workers’ unions

Abstract

Query

Present the lessons found in practitioner literature on the implementation and impact of skills development provided by non-state actors in South Asia. Specifically, look at models that combine skills training with employment support, identifying challenges, good practices and good approaches. Where possible, mention lessons about the linkages to social protection and livelihoods programmes. Where possible, identify what constrains the ultrapoor, youth, women and vulnerable groups in harnessing these opportunities.

Overview

Development practitioners increasingly see skills development as a way to improve the employment and incomes of the poor. However, findings on the effectiveness of such trainings are typically mixed. Only programmes that entail linkages with the labour market have had a significant impact. Even with such linkages in place, what has worked and what has failed in implementation and impact?

This rapid review focuses on practitioner literature about non-state provision of skills development in South Asia. Non-state providers discussed in the literature include for-profit training institutes, businesses, non-profit NGOs, and employers’ and workers’ unions. It finds there is little rigorous knowledge about non-state provision of skills development in South Asia.

Citation

Combaz, E. Non-state provision of skills development in South Asia (GSDRC Helpdesk Research Report 1196). Governance and Social Development Resource Centre, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK (2015) 19 pp.

Non-state provision of skills development in South Asia (GSDRC Helpdesk Research Report 1196)

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