Medical students of Kyrgyzstan: Smoking prevalence and attitudes to smoking cessation counseling.

Abstract

A survey was conducted to determine the current prevalence of smoking among medical students at the Kyrgyz State Medical Academy in Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan, and to ascertain their readiness for counseling on smoking cessation.

The overall prevalence of smoking among medical students was 35% (47.9% among men and 22.5% among women), with the highest rate among year 6 students (85.7% for men and 58% for women). The CO-adjusted prevalence for the entire sample was 44.8%. Overall 69% of students believed that smoking is related to cancer and chronic diseases however, the longer students were in school, the less confidence they demonstrated in this relationship. While 85.2% reported that advice should be given to smokers to stop, only 63% considered it potentially effective. Only 17.2% were aware of the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control, 90% of these supported its ratification, women significantly more so than men OR = 2.24, p
Across the years of study, the prevalence of smoking among medical students increased, and reached its peak at year 6. The lack of knowledge about tobacco control along with a decreased potential for anti-smoking advocacy likely reflect deficiencies in the educational curricula. There is an urgent need to address relevant changes in the educational curricula for medical students.

Citation

Prevention and Control (2006) 2 (1) 31-37 [doi: 10.1016/j.precon.2006.07.002]

Medical students of Kyrgyzstan: Smoking prevalence and attitudes to smoking cessation counseling.

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