MANIFEST Progress Brief No.3. Mentorship Contributes to Quality Improvement in Maternal and Newborn Care, Health Worker Motivation

This brief is based on views of mentors and mentees after a 6 month mentorship exercise in Kamuli, Kibuku and Pallisa in eastern Uganda.

Abstract

As it is in most low income countries, in Uganda, health care providers at primary health care level have limited access to experienced clinicians and specialists to call upon for consultation, review of cases, problem solving and reinforcing clinical diagnosis and decision making.

This has, in turn, compromised the provision of quality health services, hence leading to poor outcomes. In light of this, the concept of clinical mentorship is increasingly becoming important in order to improve the delivery of quality healthcare services.

This MANIFEST Progress Brief is based on perspectives of mentors and mentees following a six month mentorship exercise in the districts of Kamuli, Kibuku and Pallisa in eastern Uganda. It outlines the issue, the approach taken, preliminary results, a summary of findings, improvements in clinical care, administrative improvements and challenges.

Citation

Maternal and NeonatalImplementation for Equitable Systems (MANIFEST). MANIFEST Progress Brief No.3. Mentorship Contributes to Quality Improvement in Maternal andNewborn Care, Health Worker Motivation. (2015) 4 pp.

MANIFEST Progress Brief No.3. Mentorship Contributes to Quality Improvement in Maternal and Newborn Care, Health Worker Motivation

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