Management of Tuberculosis: 10 common pitfalls to avoid

This article discusses the 10 most common pitfalls that doctors should avoid to improve the quality of TB care

Abstract

Indian TB patients get diagnosed after a delay of nearly 2 months, and are seen by 3 different providers before a diagnosis is made. At the primary care level, patients rarely get investigated for TB, even when they present with classic TB symptoms. Instead, providers give broad-spectrum antibiotics (e.g., fluoroquinolones) and remedies such as cough syrups and steroids. Even when TB is considered likely, private physicians tend to order tests that are non-specific, such as complete blood count, ESR, Mantoux test, and chest X-rays. They rarely seek microbiological confirmation via sputum smear microscopy, culture or polymerase chain reaction tests. Even if the diagnostic hurdle is overcome, TB treatment in the private sector is far from standard. When private practitioners initiate anti-TB treatment, they tend to use drug regimens that are not recommended by WHO or the International Standards of TB Care. Furthermore, private practitioners often fail to ensure treatment completion, and provide adherence support to their patients.

This article discusses the 10 most common pitfalls that doctors should avoid. Addressing these pitfalls should great improve the quality of TB care in India.

This research was supported by the UK Department for International Development’s Operational Research Capacity Building Programme led by the International Union Against TB and Lung Disease (The Union)

Citation

Dr Srinath Satyanarayana , Dr Madhukar Pai (2015) Management of Tuberculosis: 10 common pitfalls to avoid. Express Healthcare March 8, 2016

Management of Tuberculosis: 10 common pitfalls to avoid

Published 8 March 2016