Linking Knowledge: A Qualitative Analysis of Gender and IWRM-related Policies in the Upper East Region of Ghana

Abstract

Through this study, it can be concluded that although women’s groups are conceptualized as a means to increase women’s ability to overcome systemic and structural barriers such as a lack of mutual support, lack of access to agricultural inputs, and lack of access to capital, other factors, such as ineffective government policies and programming, and traditional decision-making structures that confine women to defer to chiefs for support, continue to inhibit the realization of gender-inclusive IWRM policy initiatives in the region. While women of the Upper East Region do not necessarily reflect women of Ghana as a whole, this study hopes to provide insights to organizations like the Challenge Program on Water and Food on how to appropriately integrate women into future research and programming efforts in order to truly achieve gender-inclusive IWRM initiatives. In addition, the study’s analysis of IWRM-related policies and how they fail to fully address gender in agriculture and water-related issues will hopefully engage government officials and involve nongovernmental organizations to improve current policies and practices so that women can become more meaningfully involved.

Citation

Lasiter, K.; Stawicki, S. Linking Knowledge: A Qualitative Analysis of Gender and IWRM-related Policies in the Upper East Region of Ghana. The CGIAR Challenge Program on Water and Food, Colombo, Sri Lanka (2014) 52 pp.

Linking Knowledge: A Qualitative Analysis of Gender and IWRM-related Policies in the Upper East Region of Ghana

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