Less is more: restricted application on insecticide to cattle to improve the cost and efficacy of tsetse control

Abstract

Studies were carried out in Zimbabwe of the responses of tsetse to cattle treated with deltamethrin applied to the parts of the body where most tsetse were shown to land. Large proportions of Glossina pallidipes Austen (Diptera: Glossinidae) landed on the belly (∼ 25%) and legs (∼ 70%), particularly the front legs (∼ 50%). Substantial proportions of Glossina morsitans morsitans Westwood landed on the legs (∼ 50%) and belly (25%), with the remainder landing on the torso, particularly the flanks (∼ 15%). Studies were made of the knockdown rate of wild, female G. pallidipes exposed to cattle treated with a 1% pour-on or 0.005% suspension concentrate of deltamethrin applied to the (a) whole body, (b) belly and legs, (c) legs, (d) front legs, (e) middle and lower front legs, or (f) lower front legs. The restricted treatments used 20%, 10%, 5%, 2% or 1% of the active ingredient applied in the whole-body treatments. There was a marked seasonal effect on the performance of all treatments. With the whole-body treatment, the persistence period (knockdown > 50%) ranged from ∼ 10 days during the hot, wet season (mean daily temperature > 30 °C) to ∼ 20 days during the cool, dry season (

Citation

Torr, S.J.; Maudlin, I.; Vale, G.A. Less is more: restricted application of insecticide to cattle to improve the cost and efficacy of tsetse control. Medical and Veterinary Entomology (2007) 21 (1) 53-64. [DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2915.2006.00657.x]

Less is more: restricted application on insecticide to cattle to improve the cost and efficacy of tsetse control

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