Helpdesk Report: Seasonality in South Sudan

This helpdesk report examines the characteristics of seasonal spikes in South Sudan.

Abstract

Query

  1. Document the characteristics of seasonal spikes in South Sudan: what sector/ areas of needs is concerned (food insecurity, acute malnutrition, diseases, anything else), what is the extent of seasonal spikes (how do prevalence/ incidence/ caseloads change), what are the triggers? What is the extent of a spike in a ‘normal year’ and the extent of a spike in abnormal circumstances?

  2. Investigate the extent to which humanitarian and development interventions in the country plan seasonally (dry season planning, surge plans in health, nutrition, food security or social protection, etc).

Summary

Malnutrition in Southern Sudan is caused by various factors, including changing seasons. Food insecurity is a major problem. A general lack of dietary diversity is also a contributing factor. From 2004 to 2009 the trends in prevalence of acute malnutrition among children under 5 fluctuated around 19 percent, of which about 3 percent of cases were severe. This level surpasses the World Health Organization (WHO) emergency threshold of 15 percent. The prevalence varies seasonally and across regions. The rate of acute malnutrition peaks annually between April and June. Acute malnutrition has not decreased since the 2005 Comprehensive Peace Agreement. There has not been a significant change in malnutrition rates despite the cessation of hostilities for more than three years. This helpdesk aims to document the characteristics of seasonal spikes in South Sudan. It also investigates the extent to which humanitarian and development interventions in the country plan seasonally.

Citation

Bolton, L.; Thompson, S. Helpdesk Report: Seasonality in South Sudan. Health and Education Advice and Resource Team (HEART), Oxford, UK (2015) 27 pp.

Help us improve GOV.UK

Don’t include personal or financial information like your National Insurance number or credit card details.