Helminthic infections rates and malaria in HIV-infected pregnant women on anti-retroviral therapy in Rwanda

Abstract

Background: Within sub-Saharan Africa, helminth and malaria infections cause considerable morbidity in HIV-positive pregnant women and their offspring. Helminth infections are also associated with a higher risk of mother-to-child HIV transmission. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of, and the protective and risk factors for helminth and malaria infections in pregnant HIV-positive Rwandan women receiving anti-retroviral therapy (ART). Methodology and principal findings: Pregnant females (n = 980) were recruited from health centres in rural and peri-urban locations in the central and eastern provinces of Rwanda. Helminth infection was diagnosed using the Kato Katz method whilst the presence of Plasmodium falciparum was identified from blood smears. The prevalence of helminth infections was 34.3%; of malaria 13.3%, and of co-infections 6.6%. Helminth infections were more common in rural (43.1%) than peri-urban (18.0%; p

Citation

Ivan, E.; Crowther, N.J.; Mutimura, E.; Osuwat, L.O.; Janssen, S.; Grobusch, M.P. Helminthic infections rates and malaria in HIV-infected pregnant women on anti-retroviral therapy in Rwanda. PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases (2013) 7 (8) e2380. [DOI: 10.1371/journal.pntd.0002380]

Helminthic infections rates and malaria in HIV-infected pregnant women on anti-retroviral therapy in Rwanda

Help us improve GOV.UK

Don’t include personal or financial information like your National Insurance number or credit card details.