Flexibility in funding mechanisms to respond to shocks

This rapid reviews looks at examples of flexible funding mechanisms and lessons learned

Abstract

Question for this helpdesk report:

  • What lessons have been learned internationally about the use of crisis modifiers and other similar mechanisms which build flexibility into humanitarian or development funding arrangements in order to build in the ability to respond better/faster to new shocks (such as sudden-onset disasters, drought or spikes in conflict/displacement)?

  • Is there any international best practice around these types of arrangements?

In order to better and more rapidly respond to shocks such as sudden onset disasters, there have been increasing efforts to build flexibility into humanitarian or development funding arrangements, as current emergency responses are often slow to arrive and/or unresponsive to forecasts of disasters.

This rapid review looks at examples of such flexible funding mechanisms and lessons learned. The evidence uncovered by this rapid review comes entirely from grey literature and is a mix of reports published by organisations implementing flexible funding mechanisms in their programmes and independent evaluations of these programmes. Often the focus of these reports has been the programme in general rather than the funding mechanism and any lessons learned from it. The rapid review did not find any collective international best practice in relation to these flexible funding arrangements.

Citation

Rohwerder, B. (2017). Flexibility in funding mechanisms to respond to shocks (GSDRC Helpdesk Research Report 1412). Birmingham, UK: GSDRC, University of Birmingham. 17pp

Flexibility in funding mechanisms to respond to shocks

Published 1 July 2017