Final report: Assessing the impact of ICF programmes on household and community resilience to climate variability and climate change

Abstract

This report details the findings of a short assignment on the measurement of resilience commissioned by DFID as part of its support to the UK’s International Climate Fund (ICF). The purpose of the assignment was to review existing methodologies for measuring resilience and to present a methodology for the measurement of resilience that allows ICF projects to report against certain ICF Key Performance Indicators (KPIs). The assignment paid particular attention to the need to establish methodologies for assessing project results under the Building Resilience and Adaptation to Climate Extremes and Disasters (BRACED) programme, funded under the ICF.

The report reviews existing and emerging methodologies for measuring resilience and assesses their applicability to ICF and BRACED projects. It also examines how the measurement of resilience is treated in existing ICF M&E plans, and in BRACED project proposals. It draws on these findings to develop a novel methodology for the measurement of resilience at the household and community levels as part of the monitoring and evaluation (M&E) of ICF and BRACED projects.

This novel methodology addresses ICF KPI4 (Number of people whose resilience has been improved as a result of ICF support), which is the KPI most relevant to the measurement of resilience. The new methodology represents a revision of this guidance, and is presented in Annex 1 and discussed in the main text of this report.

This report has been produced by Landell Mills and Garama 3C Ltd for the UK Department for International Development (DFID) Adaptation Knowledge and Tools programme and published through Evidence on Demand.

The Adaptation Knowledge and Tools programme is a DFID-funded programme intended to maximise the effectiveness of UK and international investment in climate change adaptation and resilience. The knowledge and tools generated through this programme are expected to promote greater understanding of what constitutes best practice in adaptation, as well as better international cohesion and coordination around adaptation. Through these entry points the programme expects to increase the quality of international and UK adaptation programming and reduce its risk.

Citation

Brooks, N.; Aure, E.; Whiteside, M. Final report: Assessing the impact of ICF programmes on household and community resilience to climate variability and climate change. Evidence on Demand, UK (2014) vi + 96 pp. [DOI: 10.12774/eod_cr.june2014.brooksetal]

Final report: Assessing the impact of ICF programmes on household and community resilience to climate variability and climate change

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