Economic and social upgrading in global apparel production networks

Abstract

The apparel industry is one of the most globalized. Export production contributes substantially to national export earnings and employs tens of millions worldwide, particularly women in low-income countries. However, the globalization of production has also led to poor working conditions and regional wage depression. Over time, the national structure of manufacturer-driven value chains has given way to increasingly fragmented production systems, but in recent years the trend towards concentration, supply chain transparency and strategic partnerships between buyers and suppliers has improved conditions for some supplier firms and workers. Trade and preferential market access policies severely constrain economic and social upgrading opportunities.

This is a revised version of the Summit Briefing which informed panel discussions and stimulated debate at the Capturing the Gains Summit, ‘Capturing the Gains in Value Chains’, held in Cape Town, South Africa, 3-5 December 2012 (http://www.capturingthegains.org/ summit/). It incorporates recommendations arising from debate with key stakeholders at the Summit.

Citation

Pickles, J.; Godfrey, S. Economic and social upgrading in global apparel production networks. (2013) 9 pp. [Revised Summit Briefing No. 6.2]

Economic and social upgrading in global apparel production networks

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