Draft paper on HIV/AIDS, socio-economic mobility and chronic poverty: case study results from a small panel in Rakai, Uganda.

Abstract

Fourteen HIV/AIDS households were interviewed in 1993 and again in 2000 or 2002 about the impact of HIV/AIDS on their households and livelihoods. This was used to generated ideas about what maintains people in chronic poverty, the contribution of HIV/AIDS, and the possibilities of exit. The picture is apparently more fluid than expected, due to dramatic but local economic growth for those able to take advantage of this, and the positive impact of AIDS deaths on land fragmentation. However, almost no progressing households were able to invest in secondary education, which would be an indicator of more sustained exit from poverty. The maintainance of poverty over a long period of time for the majority of households has more to do with household structure and intra-household relations, and the capabilities and freedoms derived from these than with structural socio-economic factors, which were relatively permissive. This suggests a new range of policies designed to address some of these constraints.

Citation

Draft paper on HIV/AIDS, socio-economic mobility and chronic poverty: case study results from a small panel in Rakai, Uganda, presented at Staying Poor: Chronic Poverty and Development Policy, Institute for Development Policy and Management, University of Manchester, 7-9 April 2003. Chronic Poverty Research Centre (CPRC), Manchester, UK,17 pp.

Draft paper on HIV/AIDS, socio-economic mobility and chronic poverty: case study results from a small panel in Rakai, Uganda.

Help us improve GOV.UK

Don’t include personal or financial information like your National Insurance number or credit card details.