Degrees of Destitution: A Typology of Homelessness in Developing Countries

Abstract

There is an ongoing attempt to develop a globally acceptable definition of homelessness. Whether such a definition is broad and inclusive of squatters, and those living in particularly poor quality housing, or narrowly focused on street homelessness, it is likely to include a large population. Therefore, we are left with a need to develop criteria for identifying, allocating and prioritising appropriate support. Drawing on a study of homelessness in nine developing countries, this paper presents a new categorisation or typology of homelessness, based on choice and opportunity. It highlights the way in which homeless people, living in identical shelter situations, and for ostensibly similar reasons, might require different responses to support them out of homelessness. This paper does not seek to debate the definition of homelessness but to stimulate discussion on finding a way to identify and prioritise the needs of those included within any given definition

Citation

Housing Studies (2004) 19 (3) 465-482 [doi: 10.1080/0267303042000204331]

Degrees of Destitution: A Typology of Homelessness in Developing Countries

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