Concerns and experiences of women participating in a short-term AZT intervention feasibility study for prevention of HIV transmission from mother-to-child.

Abstract

This paper describes the experiences and concerns of women participating in a short-term AZT intervention feasibility study to prevent mother-to-child HIV transmission at three sites in India. The study used qualitative methods to examine the experiences of 31 women during late pregnancy, delivery and at post-natal visits. It also elicited the perspectives of 19 healthcare providers. Frequent visits required during late-pregnancy and the post-natal period presented concerns for the women in the study. Women's understanding of the long-term implications of participating in the intervention study was poor, and living with uncertainty about the HIV status of the newborn was a major concern. The provision of psychosocial support is essential in future intervention studies and should be incorporated on an ongoing basis. Networking with women-centred support groups may be helpful in enabling women to gain the long-term benefits of this type of intervention.

Citation

Culture, Health & Sexuality (2007) 9 (2) 199-207 [doi: 10.1080/13691050600942249]

Concerns and experiences of women participating in a short-term AZT intervention feasibility study for prevention of HIV transmission from mother-to-child.

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