CHIP Report 12: Donors and childhood poverty in sub-Saharan Africa: Approaches and aid mechanisms in Ghana and Tanzania

Abstract

Ghana and Tanzania receive substantial amounts of aid for poverty reduction, much of it through 'newer' forms of aid, such as Sector Wide Approaches and Multi-donor Budget Support. How far do donors prioritise tackling poverty among children? And what implications do these forms of aid have for reducing childhood poverty? CHIP research found that few donors explicitly aim to reduce childhood poverty and most saw children as one of a series of 'special groups' vying for their support, rather than a strategic investment. Most assume that the benefits of the aid they provide will trickle down to children, but few assess how far this is the case. While supportive of the move towards aid that supports national capacity and locally-defined priorities, the report warns that today's children cannot wait till strong systems are built and must be a priority for investment now. This may require a carefully thought-out mixture of general budget support, investment in specific sectors and particular projects, and a continued role for channelling support through civil society organisations where these are best placed to reach the poorest children and families.

Citation

Marshall, J., Ofei-Aboagye, E. (2004) CHIP Report 12: Donors and childhood poverty in sub-Saharan Africa: Approaches and aid mechanisms in Ghana and Tanzania. Childhood Poverty Research and Policy Centre (CHIP), London, UK, ISBN: 1-904922-12-0, viii + 85 pp.

CHIP Report 12: Donors and childhood poverty in sub-Saharan Africa: Approaches and aid mechanisms in Ghana and Tanzania

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