Assessing the impact of a right to sanitation on improving levels of access and quality of services. Executive summary.

Abstract

The overall purpose of the research was to explore the hypothesis that: Fulfilment of a right to sanitation is strongly connected with a State's approach to Citizen-Service Engagement (CSE) processes and Voice and Accountability mechanisms which encourage people's participation in decision-making and co-management of services. Fulfilment has less to do with a State’s formal recognition of the right to sanitation, or stated commitment to it.

The study involved assessment against the rights-principles of: participation and empowerment, inclusion and non-discrimination, and accountability, transparency and fulfilment of obligation. It also focused strongly on whether improvement in services is working towards fulfilling the rights standards in relation to all aspects of service planning, provision, management, delivery, use and monitoring. It also means that improvements will be sustained over time and will lead to improved economic, health status and well-being of service users.

The research involved a global literature review covering a broad range of countries; four rapid country studies (Bangladesh, Nepal, Kenya and Rwanda), and tele-interviews with key stakeholders. The research was not a full assessment, or impact analysis, of work undertaken for sanitation improvement; but it has enabled important insights into the effects of formal recognition of a right to sanitation (RTS). Key policy messages are outlined in this summary document.

Citation

Coffey International Development, London, UK, 6 pp.

Assessing the impact of a right to sanitation on improving levels of access and quality of services. Executive summary.

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