An Inquiry into the Use of Illegal Electoral Practices and Effects of Political Violence and Vote-buying

Abstract

This article investigates whether vote-buying and the instigation of violence in the disputed 2007 Kenyan elections were strategically motivated and whether those affected by vote-buying or post-electoral violence changed their views toward ethnopolitics and the use of violence. To answer these questions, a panel survey conducted before and after the elections is combined with external indicators of electoral violence. We find that vote-buying was used to mobilize parties’ own strongholds. Political parties also targeted vote-buying and threats toward specific ethnic groups and areas, potentially to weaken the support of their political rivals. In addition, we find that the victims of post-electoral violence are more likely to identify in ethnic terms and support the use of violence. The non-victims of post-electoral violence, but who experienced vote-buying after our first survey are also more likely to support the use of violence.

Citation

Gutiérrez-Romero, R. An Inquiry into the Use of Illegal Electoral Practices and Effects of Political Violence and Vote-buying. Journal of Conflict Resolution (2014) 58 (8) 1500-1527. [DOI: 10.1177/0022002714547902]

An Inquiry into the Use of Illegal Electoral Practices and Effects of Political Violence and Vote-buying

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