A tale of two cultures: ethnicity and cycling behaviour in urban Ghana. (Doc. no. PA1320/94).

Abstract

This paper reports the findings of a preliminary study of attitudes towards cycling in Accra, Ghana. Significant differences have been found to exist between cycling practice and attitudes towards cycling in two areas of the city which share low income characteristics but have a different ethnic social base. The paper explores three key propositions:

  • Riding is commonplace in Nima, where it appears an everyday part of childhood and an accepted means of transport. In Jamestown, it is seen as dangerous and the behaviour of rebellious, deviant school age males.

  • There is an established network of bicycle hiring traders which facilitate access to bicycles at a higher level than ownership figures suggest.

  • Women riders and women hiring traders act as role models for other women of all ages to ride bicycles.

It then considers the policy consequences of these findings in the context of the promotion of non-motorised means of transport.

Citation

73rd Annual Meeting of the Transportation Research Board, Washington D.C., January 1994. TRL - Crowthorne, UK. pp. 14

A tale of two cultures: ethnicity and cycling behaviour in urban Ghana. (Doc. no. PA1320/94).

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