A political analysis of corporate drug donations: the example of Malarone® in Kenya

Abstract

The fostering of a new era of public-private partnership is widely regarded as being fundamental to supporting the development of new tools to combat diseases of global importance. About 1 million people may have died from the direct consequences of Plasmodium falciparum in Africa during 1997. Furthermore, the repeated clinical consequences of infection place a burden on households, the health service, and ultimately the economic development of communities and countries. The Roll Back Malaria initiative aims to halve malaria mortality by the year 2010. This optimistic goal has been conceived at a time when existing, affordable therapies are rapidly failing, health-service provision is weak and fragmented, immediate prospects of widespread vaccination are few, and poverty continues to beset most populations in African states. Supporters of Roll Back Malaria, economists, and industry all support the building of a new commitment to malaria control between the private and public sectors. The umbrella of public-private partnerships covers a diverse range of initiatives from new drug and vaccine development to donation programmes.

Citation

Health Policy and Planning (2001) 16 (2) 161-170 [doi:10.1093/heapol/16.2.161]

A political analysis of corporate drug donations: the example of Malarone® in Kenya

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