World news story

British High Commissioner and Gambia Tourism Minister open Fort Bullen Museum

The British High Commission funded the National Centre for Arts and Culture (NCAC) to develop a museum at the site to tell the history of the Fort and the important role it and the UK Royal Navy played in abolishing slavery in West Africa.

This was published under the 2010 to 2015 Conservative and Liberal Democrat coalition government

Museum in Fort Bullen
British High Commissioner David Morley and the Gambian Minister for Tourism and Culture the Hon. Aja Fatou Mas Jobe Njie opened the new museum at Fort Bullen on Wednesday 10 April.

At the opening of the new museum, the Minister for Works and Infrastructure and the Minister for Youth and Sports were also present. The Governor of the North Bank Region Mr Alhagi Queen Jammeh also spoke at the event.

The British High Commission funded the National Centre for Arts and Culture (NCAC) to develop a museum at the site to tell the history of the Fort and the important role it and the UK Royal Navy played in abolishing slavery in West Africa.

It is hoped the Fort Bullen Museum will encourage greater tourism to the North Bank and help the social and economic development of the area.

Fort Bullen was built by the British in the early 1800’s to eradicate slavery in West Africa. Between 1808 and 1870 the Royal Navy seized an estimated 1635 ships and freed over 150,000 African slaves.

High Commissioner David Morley said, “I was delighted to be able to open this fascinating and informative museum which I hope will give both Gambian visitors and tourist’s the facts concerning the eradication of slavery in West Africa.

The museum has some wonderful pieces from the local region and I would encourage all visitors to the Gambia to make a visit. I congratulate the NCAC on all their hard work and dedication which has resulted in a tremendous museum for the people of the North Bank.”

Published 16 April 2013