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British High Commission Banjul helps to save Gambia's indigenous trees

The British High Commission has this year funded ‘Friends of Nature The Gambia’ to plant over 21,000 indigenous tree species across six forest reserves in The Gambia.

This was published under the 2010 to 2015 Conservative and Liberal Democrat coalition government

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British High Commissioner to The Gambia David Morley on Tuesday August 13 planted Mahogany and Ebony saplings in Kachitac Community forest reserve in Sohm village as part of a project funded by the British High Commission Banjul to save Gambia’s indigenous tree species.

The British High Commission has this year funded ‘Friends of Nature The Gambia’ to plant over 21,000 indigenous tree species across six forest reserves in The Gambia. Once grown it is hoped the indigenous trees will reforest an area of over 200 hectares.

A number of indigenous tree species are threatened with extinction in The Gambia and the High Commission is keen to do what it can to help preserve The Gambia’s biodiversity and ensure the survival of indigenous trees. The five indigenous tree species being planted are Cordyla Pinnata, Detarium Sedegalense, Diospyros Mespiliformis, Khaya Sengalensis and Sclerocary birrea.

The community reserves benefitting from the reforestation are Bokalang Community reserve in Duwasu, Beresonsoh community reserve in Jenun Kunda, Kachitac community reserve in Sohm, kailanding community reserve in Omorto in addition to the villages of Sinchu and Giborokuta.

As well as the 21,000 indigenous tree saplings the High Commission is also funding community based training in conservation, tree nursery management and tree identification.

Commenting after the tree planting ceremony, British High Commissioner David Morley said:

I was delighted to be in Sohm today to help the villagers plant indigenous tree saplings. The High Commission is thrilled to be associated with such a worthwhile cause. The thousands of saplings we planted today and that will be planted until the end of August should reap benefits for the nearby communities for many years to come. This project should help the villages better understand forest management and conservation in addition to providing sustainable plant products and income generating activities for generations to come.

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Published 14 August 2013