You can be fined up to £1,000 if you don’t tell DVLA about a medical condition that affects your driving. You may be prosecuted if you’re involved in an accident as a result.

Check with your nurse or doctor if you don’t know what type of medication you’re on.

Read leaflet INF188/2 for more information about driving a car or motorbike with diabetes.

Diabetes treated by tablets or non-insulin injections

Car or motorbike licence

Check with your doctor or nurse to find out if your treatment means you need to tell DVLA.

If you do need to tell DVLA, fill in form DIAB1 and send it to the address on the form.

Bus, coach or lorry licence

You must tell DVLA if your diabetes is treated by tablets or non-insulin injections. You must fill in:

  • form VDIAB1SG if your diabetes is treated by sulphonylurea or glinide tablets
  • form VDIAB1GEN if your diabetes is treated by any other tablets or non-insulin injections

Send the form to DVLA. The address is on the form.

Diabetes treated by insulin

Car or motorbike licence

You must tell DVLA if your diabetes is treated with insulin.

You can tell DVLA:

You can only report one condition using the online option.

Bus, coach or lorry licence

You must tell DVLA if your diabetes is treated with insulin.

Fill in form VDIAB1I and send it to DVLA. The address is on the form.

Read leaflet INS186 if you want to apply for vocational entitlement to drive larger vehicles (C1, C1E, D1, DIE, C, CE, D or DE).

Diabetes treated by diet

Car or motorbike licence

You don’t need to tell DVLA.

Bus, coach or lorry licence

You don’t need to tell DVLA.

Read leaflet INS186 if you want to apply for vocational entitlement to drive larger vehicles (C1, C1E, D1, DIE, C, CE, D or DE).