Guidance

List of controlled goods for transitional simplified procedures

Check if your goods are 'controlled goods' if you're using transitional simplified procedures.

Goods controlled for transitional simplified procedures include excise goods like alcohol or tobacco, and some goods that need a licence to import.

If you’re importing any of the goods listed here from the EU and want to use transitional simplified procedures, you’ll need to use the controlled goods procedure.

You must make sure that your goods are accompanied by full supporting documentation, for example the appropriate licence.

For each of the transitional simplified procedures controlled goods, you’ll need to find the correct commodity code to be able to declare your imports to HMRC.

Check further guidance on how to use the Trade Tariff tool to find a commodity code and how to classify your goods.

Controlled goods list for use with transitional simplified procedures

This list is subject to review and traders should check back for any updates.

Goods Description and further information Commodity codes
Excise goods Alcohol (wine and made-wine, beer, cider and perry, spirits), low alcohol beverages, denatured alcohol, imported composite goods containing alcohol (for example liquor chocolates)
- tobacco products (for example, cigarettes, cigars, hand-rolling tobacco, chewing tobacco, other smoking tobacco, unmanufactured tobacco and tobacco refuse, tobacco product manufacturing machines)
- hydrocarbon oil
- goods subject to Climate Change Levy
- biofuels
Use the commodity code search facility on the online UK Trade Tariff tool.
Anti-personnel mines Imports of anti-personnel mines and any component of an anti-personnel mine are banned except for the exclusive purpose of development and/or training in the techniques of mine detection, mine clearance or mine destruction. Import licences are issued by the Import Licensing Branch of the Department for International Trade.

For advice contact enquiries.ilb@trade.gov.uk.
Use the commodity code search facility on the online UK Trade Tariff tool.
Controlled drugs Controlled drugs specified in the Misuse of Drugs Act 1971, as amended, and the Misuse of Drugs Regulations 2001, as amended, including cocaine, diamorphine (heroin), morphine, opium, cannabis, amphetamine, lysergide (LSD), barbiturates and many others are banned from import, unless excepted either:
- by regulations made under Section 7 of the Act
- by a licence issued by the Home Office Drugs Licensing and Compliance Unit

You can find a list of controlled drugs and their classification under the Misuse of Drugs Regulations 2001 on the Home Office website. This list is not exhaustive. It’s the responsibility of the importer (not the shipping agent) to ensure that appropriate licence cover is obtained and properly declared and produced at import.

For more information visit the Home Office website.
Use the commodity code search facility on the online UK Trade Tariff tool.
Drug precursor chemicals Traders who wish to import category 1, 2 or 3 drug precursor chemicals must be licensed by, or registered with the Home Office as appropriate.

For more information visit the Home Office website.
Use the commodity code search facility on the online UK Trade Tariff tool.
Endangered species (CITES-listed endangered animals and plants or their products) The UK will continue to comply with the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES). To import or export CITES-listed endangered animals or plants, or their products, checks of CITES permits will be required at the border. CITES goods will only be able to enter the UK via specific designated points of entry. Use the commodity code search facility on the online UK Trade Tariff tool.

All CITES-listed species are contained within Annexes A to D of the EU Wildlife Trade Regulations. The Species+ database includes details of all CITES-listed species.
Explosives With certain limited exemptions an authorisation is required for the acquisition, keeping, transfer, storage and/ or manufacture of explosives. Authorisations to acquire explosives are granted by the police, while licences to store and/ or manufacture explosives are granted by the police, local authority or HSE, depending on the type and quantity of explosives. Both may be required before explosives can be lawfully kept in the UK.

Those who wish to import explosives into the UK should ensure that the explosives have been assigned a hazard classification by a signatory to the European Agreement Concerning for International Carriage of Dangerous Goods by Road (ADR) and hold a Competent Authority Document (CAD) which specifies the hazard classification and any conditions in relation to the transport of the explosives. With certain exemptions, importers should also apply for an Intracommunity Transfer Document (ICT) which authorises the transfer of the explosives into the UK. A Recipient Competent Authority (RCA) document is required for the domestic transfer of explosives.

Manufacturers or importers are required to mark most civil explosives with a unique identification code. Where it is required, the unique identification code must be marked on (or in certain cases attached to) each individual item. Different marking requirements apply, depending on the size of the explosive.

Economic operators must ensure that explosives are not placed on the market unless they conform to certain requirements, including meeting the essential safety requirements and conformity attestation against the relevant tests. More information is available on the HSE website.

For more advice, contact explosives.policy@hse.gsi.gov.uk.
Use the commodity code search facility on the online UK Trade Tariff tool.
Firearms The commercial import of all firearms, including some military goods such as cannons, torpedoes and missiles, but with the exception of some air rifles/ pistols, need an import licence. Import licences are issued by the Import Licensing Branch of the Department for International Trade. For advice contact enquiries.ilb@trade.gov.uk.

Private individuals should present to customs their firearms certificate which gives them authority to hold the imported firearm. Visitors, including those from the EU, should provide their British Visitors Permit (BVP) issued by the police. More information is available on the Home Office website.
See chapter 93 of the UK Integrated Trade Tariff.
Fish and fish products Catch certificates will need to be submitted in advance of importing fish into the UK. For imports a catch certificate will be needed for each:
- consignment
- direct landing of fish or fishery products

The exporter will have to submit the certificate to the Port Health Authorities or relevant fisheries authority. The certificate will need to be checked at least 3 working days before the estimated arrival time into the UK. This deadline could be adapted to take account of the type of fishery or distance from fishing ground to port. Catch Certificates will be risk assessed by Port Health Authorities who may verify/inspect the consignment if necessary.
See chapters 03, 16 04 and 16 05 of the UK Integrated Trade Tariff.
Nuclear materials Uranium ore concentrates, plutonium, uranium 233, uranium enriched in isotopes 233 or 235, natural uranium and mixtures, compounds and alloys containing any of the foregoing, including spent or irradiated nuclear reactor fuel elements (cartridges) can only be imported into the UK under a licence issued by the Office for Nuclear Regulation. See chapters 26 12, and 28 44 of the UK Integrated Trade Tariff.
Offensive weapons Offensive weapons which are designed to kill or inflict serious injury and do not have a legitimate use are banned or restricted from being imported into the UK. It is an offence to import certain specified weapons, including knives, swords and other blades, into the UK. However some organisations are allowed to import and hold restricted offensive weapons for specified purposes. This includes museums, galleries, universities and HM forces.

Restricted offensive weapons may also be imported by individuals under specific circumstances, for example, for exclusive use in theatrical performances, film productions, religious ceremonies or martial arts.

For more information, including a list of offensive weapons, see Home Office guidance. If you need more information about the legislation on importation of knives, swords and other offensive weapons, you can email public.enquiries@homeoffice.gsi.gov.uk.
Use the commodity code search facility on the online UK Trade Tariff tool.
Ozone depleting substances and hydrofluorocarbons Imports and exports of ozone depleting substances (ODS) and hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) are controlled under the Montreal Protocol (MP).

If you’re a business that produces or imports HFCs, either in bulk or contained in products or equipment, you may need to apply for a UK quota or hold sufficient quota authorisations to place them on the UK market.

If you import ODS, you may need to apply for UK quota. Imports of ODS must also be accompanied by a valid electronic licence, which is detailed in the customs declaration and checked by National Clearance Hub. If the goods do not hold a valid licence, they will be detained until a valid licence is obtained.

Unlicensed imports and exports of ODS are a criminal offence in the UK and imports of HFCs without quota can incur a civil penalty of up to £200,000. All businesses involved in importing F-gas and ODS must register with the Environment Agency’s F-gas system.

For more information, see guidance from the Environment Agency.
See chapters 29 03, 38 24 and 84 24 of the UK Integrated Tariff.
Pyrotechnic articles, including fireworks With certain limited exemptions an authorisation is required for the acquisition, keeping, transfer, storage and/ or manufacture of pyrotechnic articles, including fireworks. Licences to store and/ or manufacture pyrotechnic articles, including fireworks are granted by the police, local authority or HSE, depending on the type and quantity of pyrotechnic articles.

Those who wish to import pyrotechnic articles into the UK should ensure that the pyrotechnic articles have been assigned a hazard classification by a signatory to the European Agreement Concerning for International Carriage of Dangerous Goods by Road (ADR) and hold a Competent Authority Document (CAD) which specifies the hazard classification and any conditions relation to the transport of the explosives.

Economic operators must ensure that pyrotechnic articles are not placed on the market unless they conform to certain requirements, including meeting the essential safety requirements and conformity attestation against the relevant tests.

More information is available on the HSE website.
See chapter 36 04 of the UK Integrated Tariff.
Realistic imitation firearms Realistic imitation firearms, which are imitation firearms that appear so realistic that you cannot easily tell that they are not real, can only be imported into the UK in certain circumstances. The import of realistic imitation firearms is prohibited unless you’ve a valid reason to import such as re-enactment of a historic event, a member of an airsoft or paintball group or as film props. This is not an exhaustive list and you should consult the Violent Crime Reduction Act 2006 (Sections 36 and 27) for more information. Use the commodity code search facility on the online UK Trade Tariff tool.
Rough diamonds Trade in rough diamonds is regulated by the Kimberly Process (KP) Certification Scheme. If the UK leaves the EU without a deal, UK-based businesses will not be able to trade internationally in rough diamonds until the UK has secured independent participation in the KP. The government is already taking steps to do this. When the UK becomes an independent participant in the KP, all rough diamonds exports from the UK to the EU will require UK KP certification.

For updates and more information, check the guidance on trading in rough diamonds. For advice, contact the Government Diamond Office at kpuk@fco.gov.uk.
See chapter 71 02 of the UK Integrated Trade Tariff.
Torture equipment Imports of goods which could be used for the purposes of torture or capital punishment are banned. These include:
- gallows and guillotines
- electric chairs for the purpose of execution of human beings
- air-tight vaults designed for the purpose of execution of human beings by the administration of a lethal gas or substance
- automatic drug injection systems designed for the purpose of execution of human beings by the administration of a lethal chemical substance
- electric-shock belts designed for restraining human beings by the administration of electric shocks having a no-load voltage exceeding 10,000V

The only exception to the ban on the import of torture equipment is when goods are to be used for the exclusive purpose of public display in a museum in view of their historic significance. Import licences are issued by the Import Licensing Branch of the Department for International Trade. For advice contact enquiries.ilb@trade.gov.uk.
Use the commodity code search facility on the online UK Trade Tariff tool.
Toxic chemicals Chemicals under Schedule 1 of the Chemical Weapons Convention’s (CWC) Schedules of Chemicals can only be imported into the UK from a State Party to the CWC to a CWC Schedule 1 license holder, and under an import licence issued by the CWC UK National Authority in the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS).

For more information, including the CWC’s Schedule 1 chemicals, please see BEIS’ Chemical Weapons Convention guidance.

If you need more information about the licensing processes, you can email cwcna@beis.gov.uk.
Use the commodity code search facility on the online UK Trade Tariff tool.
Published 27 February 2019