Restricted Application of Insecticides: A Promising Tsetse Control Technique, but What Do the Farmers Think of It?

Abstract

Restricted application of insecticides to cattle is a cheap and safe farmer-based method to control tsetse and the diseases they transmit, i.e. human and animal African trypanosomoses. The efficiency of this new control method has been demonstrated earlier but no data is available on its perception and adoption intensity by farmers. We studied these two features in Burkina Faso, where the method has diffused thanks to two development projects. The study allowed identifying three groups of farmers with various adoption intensities, of which one was modern and two traditional. The economic benefit and the farmers' knowledge of the epidemiological system appeared to have a low impact on the early adoption process whereas some modern practices, as well as social factors appeared critical. The quality of technical support provided to the farmers had also a great influence on the adoption rate. The study highlighted individual variations in risk perceptions and benefits, as well as the prominent role of the socio-technical network of cattle farmers. The results of the study are discussed to highlight the factors that should be taken into consideration, to move discoveries from bench to field for an improved control of trypanosomoses vectors.

Citation

Bouyer, F.; Hamadou, S.; Adakal, H.; Lancelot, R.; Stachurski, F.; Belem, A.M.G.; Bouyer, J. Restricted Application of Insecticides: A Promising Tsetse Control Technique, but What Do the Farmers Think of It? PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases (2011) 5 (8) e1276. [DOI: 10.1371/journal.pntd.0001276]

Restricted Application of Insecticides: A Promising Tsetse Control Technique, but What Do the Farmers Think of It?

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