LDPI Working Paper 6. Transforming traditional land governance systems and coping with land deal transactions

Abstract

This study aimed to gain insight into how land deals have affected traditional Tanzanian land-based interactions and networks, and what coping mechanisms those affected have deployed. Case studies of land deal transactions — in both the Kisarawe district, in the Coast region and the Same district in the Kilimanjaro region —show the impact of cultivating bio-energy crops on traditional land. While the Same district employed an out-grower model to cultivate biofuel, Kisarawe district adopted the plantation approach. Traditional land governance systems and actors are affected differently by out-grower and plantation biofuel production models; the plantation model leads to traditional land governance frameworks being totally dismantled, while the out-grower model has insignificant impact on traditional land governance systems. For both models, laws and guidelines governing biofuel cultivation are ineffective: plantation and out-grower biofuel cultivation exacerbates a vicious cycle of poverty and environmental degradation. More research in other socio-ecological environments is necessary to understand broader interactions between land deals and traditional governance systems, and then to develop concrete, sound guidelines to govern foreign, national and local institutional actors involved in land deals.

Citation

Mahonge, C.P.I. LDPI Working Paper 6. Transforming traditional land governance systems and coping with land deal transactions. The Land Deal Politics Initiative, (2012) 21 pp.

LDPI Working Paper 6. Transforming traditional land governance systems and coping with land deal transactions

Help us improve GOV.UK

Don’t include personal or financial information like your National Insurance number or credit card details.