Fresh Insights Number 14. EurepGAP revisions 2007-2008: Implications of Version 3 for small-scale exporters of FFV in East Africa.

Abstract

Exports of fresh produce can earn significant income for those smallholder growers in developing countries who have access to overseas markets. In the past the requirements to satisfy authorities and buyers were relatively relaxed and informal. Then demands for better control systems and management of food safety led to changes in legislation to reduce risk. Over and above these legal requirements, retailers in Europe then developed private standards to manage risk during farm production, processing and transportation. One such private standard - EurepGAP (European Retailers Protocol for Good Agricultural Practice - now GlobalGAP) - was developed for and by European retailers to control on-farm production. The standard has established a reputation internationally and is being stipulated as a requirement by an increasing number of companies in more than 20 countries. It has now become widely recognised and is in many ways a useful ‘passport' for produce to enter the market. There are several operational advantages too, but Version 3 of EurepGAP sets the bar higher than Version 2 and will present greater challenges to growers unless agreements can be reached to mitigate these challenges.

Citation

International Institute for Environment and Development, London, UK, 33 pp.

Fresh Insights Number 14. EurepGAP revisions 2007-2008: Implications of Version 3 for small-scale exporters of FFV in East Africa.

Help us improve GOV.UK

Don’t include personal or financial information like your National Insurance number or credit card details.