Can remotely sensed meteorological data significantly contribute to reduce costs of tsetse surveys?

Abstract

A 0.125 degree raster or grid-based Geographic Information System with data on tsetse, trypanosomosis, animal production, agriculture and land use has recently been developed in Togo. This paper addresses the problem of generating tsetse distribution and abundance maps from remotely sensed data, using a restricted amount of field data. A discriminant analysis model is tested using contemporary tsetse data and remotely sensed, low resolution data acquired from the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration and Meteosat platforms. A split sample technique is adopted where a randomly selected part of the field measured data (training set) serves to predict the other part (predicted set). The obtained results are then compared with field measured data per corresponding grid-square. Depending on the size of the training set the percentage of concording predictions varies from 80 to 95 for distribution figures and from 63 to 74 for abundance. These results confirm the potential of satellite data application and multivariate analysis for the prediction, not only of the tsetse distribution, but more importantly of their abundance. This opens up new avenues because satellite predictions and field data may be combined to strengthen or substitute one another and thus reduce costs of field surveys.

Citation

Hendrickx, G.; Napala, A.; Rogers, D.J.; Bastiaensen, P.; Slingenbergh, J.H.W. Can remotely sensed meteorological data significantly contribute to reduce costs of tsetse surveys? Memorias do Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil (1999) 94 (2) 273-276.

Can remotely sensed meteorological data significantly contribute to reduce costs of tsetse surveys?

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